Articles Posted in Texas Penal Code

Deadly Conduct should be a simple charge to understand right? Was there conduct? Was it deadly? Ok, then that’s “Deadly Conduct.” But like anything in law we make the simple complicated so guys like me can wear a suit and argue in court.

What is Deadly Conduct in Texas? Two ways to get there.

A It’s any conduct that places another person in danger of serious bodily injury. The conduct has to be reckless or better, so negligence won’t get there. Pointing a gun at someone counts as well.

Welcome back to our ongoing series on Assault crimes in Texas. Today we are going to leave Texas Penal Code 22.01, which has many typical assault offenses and take a closer look at TPC 22.04. 22.04 deals with victims (or complaining witnesses) in 3 unique classes- children, elderly, and disabled.

Let’s start with some definitions. In Texas, a “child” for the purposes of 22.04 is anyone under 14. An “elderly” person is anyone over 65. A “disabled” individual is anyone with

-autism spectrum disorder, as defined by Section 1355.001, Insurance Code;-

This is part 3 of our on-going series on Texas Penal Code Section 22.01 Assault. Today we are going to talk about way to make a regular Class A assault (bodily injury) a felony. That would be an assault against a public servant. Section (a)(1)(b)(1) defines assault on a public servant as an assault against-

a person the actor knows is a public servant while the public servant is lawfully discharging an official duty, or in retaliation or on account of an exercise of official power or performance of an official duty as a public servant;

This requires that the defendant a) know the person is a public servant, and b) the public servant is performing is performing an official duty or (c) or in retaliation from the performance of an official duty. A third degree felony has a range of punishment of 2-10 years in TDC, and a possible $10,000 fine.

Assault – Family Violence is probably the most serious misdemeanor offense in Texas. As we discussed last time when we reviewed TPC 22.01 a normal Assault is a Class A Misdemeanor, and adding a family violence allegation doesn’t change that. Family Violence Assaults are still Class A Misdemeanor, the problem is that a plea of guilty, even without a conviction carries serious consequences beyond just being on probation (employment, immigration, child custody, inter alia).

A few years ago the legislature added another enhancement to Family Violence Assault which makes the offense a 3rd degree felony (2-10 years in prison, up to $10k fine). Lawyers usually call this enhancement “choking”, but the actual language of 22.01(a)(1)(b)(2) doesn’t include the work choke anywhere.

Here is what it says-

There are many different offenses with the word “assault” in them in Texas. Assault by Contact, Assault on a Public Servant, Sexual Assault, Assault Family Violence, Assault by Contact (Class C) etc. Section 22.01 of the Texas Penal Code covers a broad range of conduct, everything from Class C misdemeanor assaults to Second Degree Felony Assault. Let’s dive into the statute and see what’s going on here.

First up, what is an assault in Texas?

Basically, it’s causing bodily injury, threatening bodily injury, or offensive physical contact. Specifically

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